Thursday, July 15, 2010

The machines will soon take over

So, Mandi and I got a Roku as a wonderful wedding present - awesome, since we're big Netflix users, and just discovered we can also use and watch Amazon videos on it, too. We also had some gift cards we exchanged for a Wii Fit, because we both discovered last year that it's actually a lot of fun and- if you do it while not otherwise impaired and you don't get competitive with your sisters such that you ignore all your body's warning signs to stop- it's probably a good way to get a little exercise, which we desperately need.

Personally, I love video games. I also have carpal tunnel syndrome, so video games played with minimal repetitive hand use are much appreciated. Aerobic exercise and health are side benefits. But all that is beside the point.

The point is, to set up the Roku, we had to set it up to connect to the wireless internet (easy to do). Then we had to sign into the account on the laptop, and the Roku talked back and forth a while so we could connect it to our various accounts. Today I set up the Wii to connect to the internet, so it too can... I don't know, surf the net while not in use.

This probably sounds mundane to the majority of our users, but Mandi and I were so in awe of the Roku and my laptop talking to each other across the room- instantly, so far as our little human brains could perceive- that we had to celebrate with KFC and Supernatural Season 5 episode 1.

A few years ago (when I was in high school, I think? When did USB ports start showing up on computers?), I bought a 4GB backup drive so I could back up all my computer data. CDs weren't working for me, though they were a step up from the Zip drive. I think the 4GB backup drive cost a couple hundred dollars. It was a little larger than a normal pack of gum, it ran so slow it took most of the day to back up my files, and it got hot enough to the touch that I had to use a cloth to pick it up when it was done. Yesterday, Mandi grabbed a 4GB card for her camera for less than $20.

I still have a vintage box for Roberta Williams' "King's Quest IV: Perils of Rosella," which is the first computer adventure game I can remember playing (for the record, my mother never allowed consoles in our house). Perils of Rosella was released in 1988, and rocked the world of computer gaming with how advanced its graphics and sound were. The game came on four floppy disks (the smaller, hard ones, though I had older games on the other kind). The box boasts:

Includes an entire 215k of game data! Hard drive recommended. Mouse optional.

All I can say is, wow. The world has changed.

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